RSS

Tag Archives: Networking

Career Advice for New Grads in 140 Characters (more or less)

Has another year really gone by so quickly?  This post first appeared on May 14, 2010, but the advice still applies to 2011 grads.  If you contributed in 2010 and would like to update your advice, tweet at me using #Advice4Grads or leave your comment here.  Thanks again to everyone who contributed last year and best of luck to the Class of 2011!

The class of 2010 is graduating on Sunday. In their honor and in the spirit of true alumni networking, I asked many of the alums I interact with on Twitter to tweet me their best career advice for 2010 grads, in 140 characters or less.  

I got a great response and each is a little bit different.  Some of the alums couldn’t stop at just one,  and I included them all.   Us twitter folks are very good at writing concisely, and that is evident as you read through these snippets of advice.  Obviously, 140 characters of advice is not going to land you a job, but it can help you tweak what you are doing in your job search or how you behave in the workplace, to make that experience more successful.

Instead of providing the names, grad years and majors of these alums, I offer their twitter handles.  If you are interested in hearing more of what they have to say, follow them on Twitter; the vast majority have a link on their bio to a LinkedIn profile, website or blog.

You will also see a couple of longer bits here from a couple of alums who e-mailed me their advice, and a few more from some Non-SU alums, but nonetheless great people who I know from Twitter and wanted to help out.

Many thanks to all my Twitter friends who contributed to make this possible!  Many of the alums quoted here I have met on campus or at one of the SUccess in the City events, or spoken with on the phone.  Some I only know through Twitter.  All are wonderfully giving people who wanted to share what they have learned with you.  I would love to have your feedback in the comments section ~ let me know what your favorite bit of advice is and why.    (you’ll probably be able to guess what my favorite is 🙂

Read the rest of this entry »

 

Tags: , , , ,

Is The Study of Philosophy Meaningful for Social Media Success?

Yes. You can succeed at networking via social media tools such as Twitter and Facebook by studying and following the teachings of classical Philosophers. Many philosophy quotes that fly through the Twittersphere are either directly from a philosopher or an abstraction of a thought by a philosopher. The best way to resolve the paradox of marketing yourself without marketing yourself is to conduct social case studies of Twitter users themselves. Study what tweets are retweeted; study the A-lister’s actual work habits not just their blog posts and tweets of wisdom. In addition, study the people who do it wrong. After all, we learn what is by determining what is not.

Success is arrived at through a series of habitual actions

While many say success is a journey and not a destination, I’d argue that there is one ultimate destination in life: happiness. On the road to happiness are many stops that require taking a journey. According to Aristotle, happiness is not an emotion but a state of being reached upon complete fulfillment of desires. As long as those desires are not led by emotion and are based on good intentions, they are, therefore, virtuous. Virtuous behavior being a necessary element of happiness, it is vital to behave this way.

The following images are tweets pulled from Twitter users illustrating the link between philosophical thought and Social Media optimization.

Tweet on Aristotle and habit

Tweet from Amber Naslund on blogging habit

The Knowledge Paradox and Social Media Experts

Social media experts are like the Sophists of their time. Paid to teach their wisdom, they became scorned by the true Philosophers who refused payment for their noble teachings. Like the Sophists, social media experts claim to hold the keys to the wisdom employers are seeking. Guess what? There are no social media experts, gurus, etc…. We are all learning with and through each other. Those who take the wisdom they have learned and apply it to their various fields are qualified in their industries, thus deserving pay. However, expecting pay for knowing how to use dirty marketing tactics will have you ridiculed by those who can deliver quality results, not just meaningless numbers.

Philosophy quote from Socrates on knowing nothing

Twitter expert tweet get followers

A tweet on hating twitter experts

Experience is Enough

The only way to establish yourself as knowledgeable in the realm of social media is to do what it is that you say you know how to do. Without lived experience it is not possible to understand the intricacies of human nature as it relates to the business of marketing. However, no one is just going to give you the experience. A good way to get it on your own is to study individuals. There is little better place to do that than through social media networking platforms. Philosophical tenets have proven themselves to be everlasting. Technological advances and changes in culture have yet to make vast differences in basic human behavior. A study of a few philosophical principles such as the ones listed earlier will start you on the path to developing insight into individual behavior and finally figuring out the answer to how to get more followers. Lived experience is not enough, but it is a good start.

Chanelle Schneider, also known as @WriterChanelle on Twitter, runs There From Here where she often writes on the topic of adult internships and other career and life advice for Generation Y with a specific focus on non-graduates, the students who had to leave school but didn’t drop out. Chanelle writes for Examiner.com as the Washington, DC Social Media Examiner, and is the founder of the generational chat: #GenYChat on Twitter.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on November 2, 2010 in Networking, Social Media

 

Tags: , ,

Career Advice for New Grads in 140 Characters (more or less)

Has another year really gone by so quickly?  This post first appeared on May 14, 2010, but the advice still applies to 2011 grads.  If you contributed in 2010 and would like to update your advice, tweet at me using #Advice4Grads or leave your comment here.  Thanks again to everyone who contributed last year and best of luck to the Class of 2011!

The class of 2010 is graduating on Sunday. In their honor and in the spirit of true alumni networking, I asked many of the alums I interact with on Twitter to tweet me their best career advice for 2010 grads, in 140 characters or less.  

I got a great response and each is a little bit different.  Some of the alums couldn’t stop at just one,  and I included them all.   Us twitter folks are very good at writing concisely, and that is evident as you read through these snippets of advice.  Obviously, 140 characters of advice is not going to land you a job, but it can help you tweak what you are doing in your job search or how you behave in the workplace, to make that experience more successful.

Instead of providing the names, grad years and majors of these alums, I offer their twitter handles.  If you are interested in hearing more of what they have to say, follow them on Twitter; the vast majority have a link on their bio to a LinkedIn profile, website or blog.

You will also see a couple of longer bits here from a couple of alums who e-mailed me their advice, and a few more from some Non-SU alums, but nonetheless great people who I know from Twitter and wanted to help out.

Many thanks to all my Twitter friends who contributed to make this possible!  Many of the alums quoted here I have met on campus or at one of the SUccess in the City events, or spoken with on the phone.  Some I only know through Twitter.  All are wonderfully giving people who wanted to share what they have learned with you.  I would love to have your feedback in the comments section ~ let me know what your favorite bit of advice is and why.    (you’ll probably be able to guess what my favorite is 🙂

Read the rest of this entry »

 
5 Comments

Posted by on May 14, 2010 in Networking, Uncategorized

 

Tags: , , , ,

On being connected

Today’s Guest Post is by Amy Merlino Coey, VPA ’94

I’m from Philadelphia, where my maiden surname belies my blood ties to some notorious organized crime figures, so being “connected” for me was always a dubious distinction.  Nevertheless, “connected” in the mafia-sense of the word means something positive.  If you’re connected to a powerful mobster you might get a V.I.P. table at a restaurant or dodge a speeding ticket, or obtain even bigger and better rewards.  But it has been my connections to Syracuse University that have truly shaped my career path and my adult life.

In my business, which is the business of Broadway, the Syracuse “Mafia” is well-known and regarded.  Powerhouse Producer Arielle Tepper Madover ’94, Producer and Merchandising wiz Michael Rego ’90 and Bona-fide Broadway diva Julia Murney ’90, are just a few of the illustrious alums who are making their mark on the Great White Way.

Being connected to these and other SU grads has been about more than sharing an alma mater, though.  A colleague from Syracuse got me my first job in commercial theatre (well, he set up the interview…I like to think I got myself the job!)  I was at a crossroads—I knew I was meant to be in the management side of theatre, but I wasn’t excited about the non-profit world.   My SU friend not only intuited what the perfect job for me would be, he introduced me to the people who could make it happen!

Recently, I was chatting with colleagues from a rival “mafia” (another University well-represented behind-the-scenes on Broadway) and we were reflecting on the fact that you never quite know when you choose a college, how very important that decision will be.   My Syracuse connections got me my dream job, which led to a thriving career, and my career led me to my husband, and hence my son.  I believe in Fate to a certain degree, and if Fate exists, then Fate first and foremost brought me to Syracuse.  Happily, all the rest just followed.

Amy Merlino Coey served as the Company Manager of the original Commercial Off-Broadway productions of FULLY COMMITTED and THE VAGINA MONOLOGUES.  She was the Assistant Company Manager for the Broadway stagings of THE GRADUATE and the 2002 revival of MAN OF LA MANCHA.  She has company managed both LITTLE WOMEN: THE MUSICAL and WICKED on Broadway, as well as the 1st National Tours of THE GRADUATE and BILLY CRYSTAL’S 700 SUNDAYS.

Now the mother of a young son, she works part-time as a Management Associate for 321 Theatrical Productions, a General Management firm currently represented on Broadway by WICKED and NEXT TO NORMAL.  She is a member of the Association of Theatrical Press Agents and Managers (ATPAM).

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on March 3, 2010 in Networking

 

Tags: , , ,

Don’t take chances with your chances

I say this time and time again, but I will say it again.  The more people that know you are looking for a job and what kind of job you are looking for, the better.

Here’s a success story.  A recent grad came to me a few months ago on a drop-in basis.  She was somewhat depressed about the fact that she hadn’t yet found a job.  I assured her that it wasn’t her fault and that many people from her graduating class were in the same boat.  By the time she left my office she said she was feeling better and more confident.

Over the next several weeks, I helped her connect with a couple of recruiters, gave her some advice on writing an e-mail to a networking contact and tried to buoy her spirits whenever I could.

Yesterday, a recruiter from a national corporation came by my office and talked about what her company looks for in candidates for their management training program.  The recruiter happened to be from exactly the field my new grad has been looking for work in.  This recruiter was in town to conduct on-campus interviews and was also doing an informational session last night.  When I asked if she would consider a May grad, she said right away that she would, gave me her card and suggested that I invite my new grad to the informational session.

After passing along the information, I heard back last night from my alum that she just finished an interview with said recruiter and had been selected for a second round!  You can imagine my excitement when I heard this news!!

The moral of this story is, talk to people.  Go see someone in your career center.  Talk to your former colleagues, classmates, friends and family.  Let them know what you’re looking for.  For every person you talk to, you increase your chances that an opportunity will arise that they can connect you with.   It may seem a coincidence that a recruiter for the exact type of job my alum was looking for appeared in my office.  But it wasn’t a coincidence.  What happened was a direct result me having the information I needed when I met with this recruiter.  If the new grad had never visited my office, I would never have had the opportunity to connect her.

People want to help you.  Give them the chance.

 
2 Comments

Posted by on February 25, 2010 in Uncategorized

 

Tags: ,

College Career Fair Preparation: How to Make the Most of What’s Offered

I am writing my very first ever blog post as a response to a post by Rich DeMatteo of Corn on the Job fame. Since I work in a college career center, I wanted to add my two cents to the conversation.

First, I totally agree with trying to make connections with employers ahead of time. You really have to make yourself stand out in one way or another, and making a personal connection in advance is a great way of doing that. Our career center lists all of the employers who will be attending on our website, as they register. No need to come by the office to pick up a piece of paper. Just check the website. Make sure to keep checking back, though, because employers register all the way up to the day before a career fair (sometimes the day of).

While you may (and I emphasize MAY) be able to get the contact information for the person who registered the company for the career fair, it won’t do you much good. Most companies list their recruiters as TBA and decide on who will be attending at the last minute based on staffing needs. Alumni are often sent to recruit at their alma maters, no matter what type of position they hold within the organization. Better to try to make some connections with alumni at the company through your college career center, alumni relations office or LinkedIn.

I agree with Rich that you should make sure your LinkedIn profile is in order prior to connecting with any potential employers. Internet savvy (and who isn’t) recruiters and alums will google you before they decide whether or not they will return your call or make the connection. Hopefully you realize that LinkedIn profiles come up very high in search results. Having a great LinkedIn profile that isn’t just a recitation of your resume will give them a good reason to want to connect with you.

Connecting with company representatives prior to the career fair is essential. Many companies will hold information sessions or other special events the evening prior to the career fair. These are not just ‘fluff’ events. They are excellent networking opportunities! So few students take advantage of these events because they don’t understand what they’re about. There are also business plan competitions and dinners and other professional settings in which to get yourself noticed. Most of these events are sponsored by companies because they are aware that the connections made at the career fair itself can be nebulous. They are actually handing you the opportunities to make more meaningful connections: take advantage of them.

Trying to meet with recruiters post-event may be difficult. In my experience, most recruiters are on the first plane out after a long day at career fair. Only if they are on campus for multiple days and you haven’t had the opportunity during scheduled events would I advise this.

Finally, I can’t stress enough how important follow-up is. Send that e-mail, or better yet, send that hand-written thank you note. The biggest complaint I hear from alumni mentors and recruiters is that students don’t follow up. What else can they conclude but that you aren’t really interested? Following-up is another really simple way to make yourself standout. You’d be surprised at how many people don’t take the time to do this.

As a student, what types of events are attractive for you to meet with employers? And employers, what makes an impression on you outside of career fair?

Is this where you want to connect?

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 19, 2010 in Uncategorized

 

Tags: ,