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Category Archives: Networking

Career Advice for New Grads in 140 Characters (more or less)

Has another year really gone by so quickly?  This post first appeared on May 14, 2010, but the advice still applies to 2011 grads.  If you contributed in 2010 and would like to update your advice, tweet at me using #Advice4Grads or leave your comment here.  Thanks again to everyone who contributed last year and best of luck to the Class of 2011!

The class of 2010 is graduating on Sunday. In their honor and in the spirit of true alumni networking, I asked many of the alums I interact with on Twitter to tweet me their best career advice for 2010 grads, in 140 characters or less.  

I got a great response and each is a little bit different.  Some of the alums couldn’t stop at just one,  and I included them all.   Us twitter folks are very good at writing concisely, and that is evident as you read through these snippets of advice.  Obviously, 140 characters of advice is not going to land you a job, but it can help you tweak what you are doing in your job search or how you behave in the workplace, to make that experience more successful.

Instead of providing the names, grad years and majors of these alums, I offer their twitter handles.  If you are interested in hearing more of what they have to say, follow them on Twitter; the vast majority have a link on their bio to a LinkedIn profile, website or blog.

You will also see a couple of longer bits here from a couple of alums who e-mailed me their advice, and a few more from some Non-SU alums, but nonetheless great people who I know from Twitter and wanted to help out.

Many thanks to all my Twitter friends who contributed to make this possible!  Many of the alums quoted here I have met on campus or at one of the SUccess in the City events, or spoken with on the phone.  Some I only know through Twitter.  All are wonderfully giving people who wanted to share what they have learned with you.  I would love to have your feedback in the comments section ~ let me know what your favorite bit of advice is and why.    (you’ll probably be able to guess what my favorite is 🙂

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Is The Study of Philosophy Meaningful for Social Media Success?

Yes. You can succeed at networking via social media tools such as Twitter and Facebook by studying and following the teachings of classical Philosophers. Many philosophy quotes that fly through the Twittersphere are either directly from a philosopher or an abstraction of a thought by a philosopher. The best way to resolve the paradox of marketing yourself without marketing yourself is to conduct social case studies of Twitter users themselves. Study what tweets are retweeted; study the A-lister’s actual work habits not just their blog posts and tweets of wisdom. In addition, study the people who do it wrong. After all, we learn what is by determining what is not.

Success is arrived at through a series of habitual actions

While many say success is a journey and not a destination, I’d argue that there is one ultimate destination in life: happiness. On the road to happiness are many stops that require taking a journey. According to Aristotle, happiness is not an emotion but a state of being reached upon complete fulfillment of desires. As long as those desires are not led by emotion and are based on good intentions, they are, therefore, virtuous. Virtuous behavior being a necessary element of happiness, it is vital to behave this way.

The following images are tweets pulled from Twitter users illustrating the link between philosophical thought and Social Media optimization.

Tweet on Aristotle and habit

Tweet from Amber Naslund on blogging habit

The Knowledge Paradox and Social Media Experts

Social media experts are like the Sophists of their time. Paid to teach their wisdom, they became scorned by the true Philosophers who refused payment for their noble teachings. Like the Sophists, social media experts claim to hold the keys to the wisdom employers are seeking. Guess what? There are no social media experts, gurus, etc…. We are all learning with and through each other. Those who take the wisdom they have learned and apply it to their various fields are qualified in their industries, thus deserving pay. However, expecting pay for knowing how to use dirty marketing tactics will have you ridiculed by those who can deliver quality results, not just meaningless numbers.

Philosophy quote from Socrates on knowing nothing

Twitter expert tweet get followers

A tweet on hating twitter experts

Experience is Enough

The only way to establish yourself as knowledgeable in the realm of social media is to do what it is that you say you know how to do. Without lived experience it is not possible to understand the intricacies of human nature as it relates to the business of marketing. However, no one is just going to give you the experience. A good way to get it on your own is to study individuals. There is little better place to do that than through social media networking platforms. Philosophical tenets have proven themselves to be everlasting. Technological advances and changes in culture have yet to make vast differences in basic human behavior. A study of a few philosophical principles such as the ones listed earlier will start you on the path to developing insight into individual behavior and finally figuring out the answer to how to get more followers. Lived experience is not enough, but it is a good start.

Chanelle Schneider, also known as @WriterChanelle on Twitter, runs There From Here where she often writes on the topic of adult internships and other career and life advice for Generation Y with a specific focus on non-graduates, the students who had to leave school but didn’t drop out. Chanelle writes for Examiner.com as the Washington, DC Social Media Examiner, and is the founder of the generational chat: #GenYChat on Twitter.

 
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Posted by on November 2, 2010 in Networking, Social Media

 

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3 Simple Lessons learned from Two Years in Career Services

As I start down a new avenue along my ever-changing career path, I think it’s a good time to reflect on where I’ve just been.

In June 2008 I started work at Syracuse University’s Career Services office.  And when I took the job, I knew literally NOTHING about the field of career services.  Sure, I had the right mix of experience for the my job working with alumni, but the only experience I had in terms of career was managing my own, and somewhat poorly at that.

So two years down the line, I feel like a know a little bit about careers and job search and interviewing, and especially networking….all those mysterious things that every job seeker wants to know about.  I’m going to share with you a few of the most important things I’ve learned.

1.  It’s not Rocket Science. If I can do this, so can you.  Meaning, if I can learn how to connect with the right people, learn about job opportunities and market myself, so can you.  How did I do it?  Listen and observe. The best places to do that right now are on Twitter and LinkedIn.  You can follow the most amazing people, and they are giving away FREE advice every day of the week!  It’s there for the taking!

2.  Degree/Major ≠ Career. Having managed a database with 1,700+ mentors for the past two years, I can assure you of this fact. Rarely, do you run across someone who is 5+ years out of college who is doing EXACTLY WHAT THEY THOUGHT THEY WOULD BE DOING.  The thing is, most kids growing up are only exposed to a handful of careers.  There is no way of knowing everything that exists out there, and on top of that, new career fields are being created all the time.  So when people get out of college they tend to go for the types of jobs they have *heard about*.  And that’s all well and good until they start getting exposure to the world of work and realize all the different things they could be doing.  At that point, it becomes essential that you follow what interests you, regardless of degree.  People do it all the time.  Take me for example, I have degrees in Psychology and Elementary Education.  Do I seem to you like someone who is pining away for a nice bulletin board covered with construction paper?  At one time I was…but the fantasy was better than the reality and I had to change gears.

3.  Most people are fundamentally nice. You know, it could be that there was some aberration and I was just handed the nicest people on the planet to work with, but I don’t think that’s the case.  From day one of my job in career services, I was able to interact with and assist and learn from some amazing people — students, alumni, recruiters, employers, faculty, you name it.  I could not believe my good fortune.  It seems that when you are in a position to help people, it works in your favor. People see *helpers* (for the most part) as being good.  Therefore, when they interact with helpers, they come in with their defenses down and their niceness up.  That’s a great way to interact with the world…so if you can position yourself as a helper, no matter what your career field or job title, you will be setting yourself up for success.

There’s lots more where this came from, but suffice it to say that grasping these three really simple concepts will take you places you never dreamed.

As I move into the new and exciting world of social media and become a communications professional, I will still continue to hone my skills in career and helping others find their dreams.  I will just be helping different people and using different platforms.  I hope you will come along with me on this journey and see what else we can discover and share.

 
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Posted by on June 20, 2010 in Career, Networking, Uncategorized

 

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Career Advice for New Grads in 140 Characters (more or less)

Has another year really gone by so quickly?  This post first appeared on May 14, 2010, but the advice still applies to 2011 grads.  If you contributed in 2010 and would like to update your advice, tweet at me using #Advice4Grads or leave your comment here.  Thanks again to everyone who contributed last year and best of luck to the Class of 2011!

The class of 2010 is graduating on Sunday. In their honor and in the spirit of true alumni networking, I asked many of the alums I interact with on Twitter to tweet me their best career advice for 2010 grads, in 140 characters or less.  

I got a great response and each is a little bit different.  Some of the alums couldn’t stop at just one,  and I included them all.   Us twitter folks are very good at writing concisely, and that is evident as you read through these snippets of advice.  Obviously, 140 characters of advice is not going to land you a job, but it can help you tweak what you are doing in your job search or how you behave in the workplace, to make that experience more successful.

Instead of providing the names, grad years and majors of these alums, I offer their twitter handles.  If you are interested in hearing more of what they have to say, follow them on Twitter; the vast majority have a link on their bio to a LinkedIn profile, website or blog.

You will also see a couple of longer bits here from a couple of alums who e-mailed me their advice, and a few more from some Non-SU alums, but nonetheless great people who I know from Twitter and wanted to help out.

Many thanks to all my Twitter friends who contributed to make this possible!  Many of the alums quoted here I have met on campus or at one of the SUccess in the City events, or spoken with on the phone.  Some I only know through Twitter.  All are wonderfully giving people who wanted to share what they have learned with you.  I would love to have your feedback in the comments section ~ let me know what your favorite bit of advice is and why.    (you’ll probably be able to guess what my favorite is 🙂

Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on May 14, 2010 in Networking, Uncategorized

 

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Succeeding with Social Media

Today’s guest post is by Leland Strott, NEW ’08

I first got into social media thanks to classes I took my senior year at Syracuse – Web Journalism and New Media Business. I signed up for them thinking they would supplement my Magazine Journalism career. Now, hardly a year later, social media is my passion and my main career interest! I work in Baltimore, Maryland, and two of my current jobs – an internship at an advertising firm and a part time social media position at a local sports network – were set up because of online interactions. My obsession with Twitter and social media have really paid off for me!

Even if you don’t want to tweet professionally, social media can connect you to a job in your chosen career field.  I’m a firm believer that sites like Twitter and LinkedIn are a tremendous benefit to the job hunt by building a professional community. Beyond that, blogs and other networking sites can help you establish a presence in your field. Here are a few tips for doing so:

On Twitter:
– Build a professional network. Follow experts and companies in your chosen field, especially those in the locations you want to work in.  It’s beneficial to read articles they post, and catch up on any news they mention to see what issues are important to them, which means they should also be important to you.  But don’t just follow their tweets – make your presence known by joining in conversations with them. Regular engagement is the key to establishing a more meaningful relationship, the kind of relationship that will get you a job!
– Go to Tweetups – it’s a good way to make a real connection with professionals around you.  Once you’ve established an online connection with local professionals, networking events like Tweetups are a great opportunity to cement those relationships.

Blogs:
– Set up a blog to write about your career field and professional topics, to showcase your ideas, or provide examples of work you’ve done before. This is equivalent to a portfolio, and it can show potential employers how knowledgeable (and therefore valuable!) you are.  Use a blog to fully develop ideas you may discuss on Twitter, for example, and you can send the link to show off your thoughts.

Networking sites:
– On sites like LinkedIn and Brazen Careerist, join groups related to your career field and interests. Chime in on discussion boards and start conversations. It’s a common theme, but getting your name and ideas out there will help you get noticed.
– Don’t be afraid to request connections with people whose careers you admire – take initiative and send them a message to see how they got where they are.  The worst they can do is ignore you, and at best, they could become a valuable career connection.

Last but not least:
– Make it known that you’re looking for employment. If you’ve taken the time establish yourself as a valuable member of your field, there’s a greater chance that people you have connections with will think of you first when there’s an opening in their companies. If you make a good impression online, don’t be surprised to see job offers even if you’re not looking!

Leland Strott, a native of Baltimore, MD, graduated from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University in 2008 with a degree in Magazine Journalism. She is currently back in her hometown, interning and working part time while she completes a Master’s degree in social media from Birmingham City University. She hopes to turn her passion for social media into a full-time job in advertising or marketing.

 
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Posted by on March 10, 2010 in Networking, Social Media

 

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On being connected

Today’s Guest Post is by Amy Merlino Coey, VPA ’94

I’m from Philadelphia, where my maiden surname belies my blood ties to some notorious organized crime figures, so being “connected” for me was always a dubious distinction.  Nevertheless, “connected” in the mafia-sense of the word means something positive.  If you’re connected to a powerful mobster you might get a V.I.P. table at a restaurant or dodge a speeding ticket, or obtain even bigger and better rewards.  But it has been my connections to Syracuse University that have truly shaped my career path and my adult life.

In my business, which is the business of Broadway, the Syracuse “Mafia” is well-known and regarded.  Powerhouse Producer Arielle Tepper Madover ’94, Producer and Merchandising wiz Michael Rego ’90 and Bona-fide Broadway diva Julia Murney ’90, are just a few of the illustrious alums who are making their mark on the Great White Way.

Being connected to these and other SU grads has been about more than sharing an alma mater, though.  A colleague from Syracuse got me my first job in commercial theatre (well, he set up the interview…I like to think I got myself the job!)  I was at a crossroads—I knew I was meant to be in the management side of theatre, but I wasn’t excited about the non-profit world.   My SU friend not only intuited what the perfect job for me would be, he introduced me to the people who could make it happen!

Recently, I was chatting with colleagues from a rival “mafia” (another University well-represented behind-the-scenes on Broadway) and we were reflecting on the fact that you never quite know when you choose a college, how very important that decision will be.   My Syracuse connections got me my dream job, which led to a thriving career, and my career led me to my husband, and hence my son.  I believe in Fate to a certain degree, and if Fate exists, then Fate first and foremost brought me to Syracuse.  Happily, all the rest just followed.

Amy Merlino Coey served as the Company Manager of the original Commercial Off-Broadway productions of FULLY COMMITTED and THE VAGINA MONOLOGUES.  She was the Assistant Company Manager for the Broadway stagings of THE GRADUATE and the 2002 revival of MAN OF LA MANCHA.  She has company managed both LITTLE WOMEN: THE MUSICAL and WICKED on Broadway, as well as the 1st National Tours of THE GRADUATE and BILLY CRYSTAL’S 700 SUNDAYS.

Now the mother of a young son, she works part-time as a Management Associate for 321 Theatrical Productions, a General Management firm currently represented on Broadway by WICKED and NEXT TO NORMAL.  She is a member of the Association of Theatrical Press Agents and Managers (ATPAM).

 
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Posted by on March 3, 2010 in Networking

 

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